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Sebastian Ibold

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Sebastian Ibold works as Project Manager in the Sino-German Cooperation on Low Carbon Transport. He is responsible for the coordination of project activities linked to low carbon urban transport.

The second Transport and Climate Change (TCC) Week, which included the Climate Action in Mobility Conference (CAMC), highlighted the importance and need of a transformational change in the transport sector to limit global warming by developing climate-friendly solutions. It was hosted by GIZ on behalf of the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) in Berlin from 24 to 28 September 2018. This year’s event focused on digital mobility, new business models and innovative planning in the transport sector. Nearly 200 experts and officials from ministries, institutions and city authorities from 20 countries, many from developing and emerging economies, exchanged their experiences in shaping the transport sector and discussed how to achieve a paradigm shift in transport around the world. The TCC Week started with a series of workshops on various topics in the field of sustainable transport, initiating expert dialogues with colleagues from around the…

The evolution of free-floating bike-sharing in China Authors: Sebastian Ibold, Dr. Christoph Nedopil Review: Sandra Retzer, Tina Huang, Florian Ibold Since the explosive growth of free-floating bike-sharing in China starting in 2016, it has been described as one of the country’s hottest industries. China’s official state-run press agency Xinhua called it one of the “four great new inventions” in modern times (the other three being e-commerce, high-speed rail and mobile-payment). The bike-sharing industry was praised for providing a healthy lifestyle and a key to achieve more sustainable urban transport systems, with the potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution significantly. The expectations put on free-floating bike-sharing were no less than reviving the “kingdom of bicycles”. But instead of a smooth bike-ride, the bike sharing industry in China has experienced nothing short of a roller-coaster ride: From 2016 onwards, a growing number of start-ups entered the bike-sharing market, resulting…

To jointly elaborate on how to make China’s cities cycling-ready, the GIZ “Mobility and Fuels Strategy as a Contribution to the Transport Transition in China”(MFS) project together with the GIZ “Sino-German Cooperation on Low Carbon Transport” (CLCT) project, the GIZ “Sino-German Urbanisation Partnership” project (SGUP), the Ministry of Transport (MoT), the China Academy of Transportation Sciences (CATS) and SinoCarbon Innovation & Investment Co.,Ltd., jointly organized a cycling workshop on April 12, 2018 in Beijing. The aim of this workshop was to elaborate on challenges and opportunities of cycling in the urban context, related policies and best practices in China and Germany. Besides the organizers, various representatives of provincial transport planning institutes and cycling experts from Germany attended the workshop. After a welcoming by Mr. Wang Guangmin, Head of the Environmental Protection Division of the MoT, Ms. Sandra Retzer, Head of the cluster Urbanisation, Transport and Energy of GIZ China, introduced…

[Image: Cenitt] Globally, the transport and mobility sector is undergoing a holistic transformation, due to technological innovation, new business models, changing customer demands and political pressure to tackle environmental challenges. One possibly very sustainable development has been the growth of ride- and car-sharing services within the last years. This article provides an overview of the current dynamics of China`s car-sharing market, focusing on B2C business models and on providing an outlook on what the future of mobility may look like. The need for shared mobility in China is high In China, car ownership rate is still very low, e.g. when compared to Germany. In early 2016, the car density in Germany was 552 passenger cars per 1,000 inhabitants, which means that a total of 45.7 million cars rolled on Germany`s roads. In comparison, Chinese roads carried about 163.1 million passenger cars in the same year, which equals a car density of 118 cars per…

Intermodal freight transport (combined transport) is one pillar of the shift approach within climate action strategies to make freight transport and logistics greener and more sustainable, thus effectively meet the targets of the Paris Agreement. Using combined transport means shifting road freight transport to more CO2 efficient modes such as rail or waterborne transport and therefore significantly reduces CO2 emissions and the energy consumption per loading unit. With growing freight volumes – not only in China but also in Germany and many other economies around the globe – and the shift away from large-scale bulk goods towards the small-scale cargo of higher value goods, all stakeholders in the logistics chain are challenged to optimize their operation and resource allocation to provide a sustainable and competitive service. To promote intermodal freight transport especially policy makers, infrastructure providers and managers, railway undertakings, combined transport operators, terminal operators as well as road haulage…

Co-authored with Sandra Retzer. Over the past decades, the People’s Republic of China not only underwent rapid urbanization and an impressive socio-economic transformation but also a tremendous de­velopment of its transport infrastructure. Today China has the longest high-speed railway network and has just brought its 350 km/h Fuxing (复兴 – renaissance) bullet train back on line, connecting Beijing and Shanghai (1,300km) with just four and a half hours of travel time. The same impressive de­velopment counts equally for the expansion of China`s high­way, aviation, shipping and public urban transport system. However, along with progress came challenges. Today, the transport sector is also associated with traffic congestion and clogged cities, this accounts for the high shares of carbon emissions and is a significant source of noise and (urban) air pollution with up to 30 percent shares of particulate matters in some of the big cities. The Chinese government is aware of…

In Europe, close cooperation and exchange among cities and countries have a long tradition. Especially in the framework of joint European Union (EU) activities, best practices in sustainable urban mobility are exchanged and innovative ideas spread. Beyond Europe’s borders, transport-related innovations are growing rapidly in developing and emerging countries in the recent years. Not only in mega cities worldwide, decision makers, entrepreneurs and plan­ners are currently testing new approaches to urban mobility – driven by enormous pressures, such as urban sprawl, congestion and air pollution, but also new opportunities related to new digital technologies and rapid economic development. Learning more about their successes as well as potential difficulties may inspire sustainable urban transport develop­ment in Europe and Germany. With the intention to provide a glimpse to the transport innovations of developing and emerging countries and discuss the vision of Tommorow’s Cities in the light of global innovation, the German Environment…

With the rapid growth of vehicle populations, Chinese cities are facing parking challenges. In the past, cities tended to solve parking problems simply by increasing supply, for example, by converting more curb lanes and sidewalks into parking spaces, by subsidizing the construction of municipal parking facilities and by increasing the number of parking spaces required in new development. In recent years, many cities have started to apply a new parking-planning paradigm to enhance efficient parking management. Parking management was seen as an important TDM (Transportation Demand Management) instrument to mitigate urban traffic congestion and to reduce GHG emissions. Against this background, from June 19 to 23, the “Sino-German Cooperation on Low Carbon Transport” project (CLCT) and the “Sustainable Urban Transport Program” (SUTP) jointly organized a parking management training course for the city of Tianjin and the city of Qingdao. Both cities are facing escalating parking problems and a lack of…

Facing rapid urbanisation and economic growth in the last decades, the transport sector has become the fastest growing consumer of fossil fuels and the fastest growing source of GHG emissions in China. At the same time, the Chinese government has addressed the topic of climate protection as an increasingly important policy issue over the past years. Now, strong capacities have to be built in the relevant institutions at national, provincial and municipal level to develop, implement and monitor strategies, policies and measures to mitigate climate change. Together with the local implementation partner, the China Academy of Transportation Sciences (CATS), one of the leading think tanks of China’s Ministry of Transport (MoT), the Sino-German cooperation on Low Carbon Transport (CLCT) project, implemented by GIZ, is conducting a study on a roadmap for China’s low carbon transport development and scenario evaluation. The study is funded by the International Climate Initiative (IKI) of the…

The development of electric vehicles (EVs, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) and battery electric vehicles (BEVs)) could enhance fuel diversity and utilise renewable energy, which is considered a promising, long-term solution to reduce high dependence on fossil fuels and alleviate climate change impacts from a global perspective. In addition, EV deployment is considered capable of improving urban air quality by reducing on-road emissions for traffic-populated areas. Chinese policymakers are aware of the potential environmental benefits of EVs in lessening urban atmospheric pollution. Decade-long discussions regarding whether fleet electrification can deliver actual environmental benefits on a regional scale have been heated during recent years. Life cycle assessment (LCA) methods were applied to determine the well-to-wheels (WTW) reduction benefits of energy consumption and emissions of greenhouse gases and air pollutants through electro-mobility. During the initial phase of the project, the full life cycle energy consumption and emissions of CO2 and major air…