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With the fast-paced development of the Chinese logistics sector and the booming Chinese freight industry, road   and highway freight volume have been growing 5.9% (to 8.19 billion tonnes) and 10.2% year-on-year respectively. To fully understand the transportation and logistics sector’s environmental and climate impact, systematically calculating, assessing and reporting the carbon footprint of the sector are crucial. The development of sound, comprehensive and accurate calculation tools and practices will greatly contribute to achieving a green and low-carbon transport sector in China and to meeting the country’s commitment of peaking carbon emissions around the year 2030. Aiming at creating a better understanding of the current system for calculating emissions of the Chinese logistics industry, to introduce effective tools and methodologies, and to exchange on best practices from Europe and China, the Smart Freight Forum – Logistics Emission Calculation Tools and Practice was held on 27 March 2019 in Beijing.  The forum…

GIZ in China has been working with the Chinese cities of Shenzhen and Foshan since 2012 on low-carbon transportation. From April 9 to 10, two GIZ experts (Dr. Christoph Nedopil and Shengyang Sun) and Benedikt Notter from INFRAS, a consultancy and engineering company based in Switzerland, travelled to Shenzhen to work with the Shenzhen Urban Transport Planning Center (SUTPC) on improving the accounting of greenhouse gases from road transportation in Shenzhen. In order to understand traffic flows, SUTPC currently collects about 750 million records of big data daily to monitor traffic flow (see also our interview with SUPTC about big data here). However, more information is necessary to quantify emissions from driving, which depend, amongst others, on the type of vehicle or whether a vehicle is stuck in a traffic jams or is driving at high-speeds. Thus, SUPTC has recorded about 7,000 hours of very detailed driving cycles from trucks…

Supported by the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH and the Shanghai Municipal Transportation Commission, the “New Energy Transportation International Forum”, co-hosted by Shanghai Transportation Trade Association and Shine Consultant, was successfully held in Shanghai on 10th and 11th January 2017. Mobility and transport are the backbone of a country’s society. From a global perspective, the entire transportation sector (passenger and freight transport) is responsible for nearly one quarter of all CO2 emissions. Even though countries such as Germany, for example, achieved significant efficiency improvements in the past (e. g. reduction in CO2 emissions per kilometer of passenger cars), the total greenhouse gas emissions within the sector have barely dropped due to an extensive rise in transport performance. This partially repeals the improvements already achieved in climate and environmental protection and shows that the absolute contribution to climate protection and the proportion of renewable energy use in the transport sector…

From 19th to 23rd September 2016 two experts from the Institute for Energy and Environment Research Heidelberg (IFEU) visited the Chinese Vehicle Emission Control Center (VECC) and a number of other Chinese institutions in Beijing in order to promote an international dialogue on transport emission modelling and emission inventory. This visit was part of the Advisory Service of the China National Transport Emission Modelling and Inventory and is a collaboration between the Sino-German Cooperation on Low Carbon Transport project (CLCT) and the Sino-German Climate Partnership project, both funded by the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMUB). The objective of this exchange is to share the experience of national transport emission inventory modelling in Germany and Europe with China and to advise VECC on updating the national emission factor database and improving the national transport emission inventory model. The joint work is particularly important as…

A delegation from the Chinese Ministry of Transport (MoT) and its affiliated institutes the Transportation Planning and Research Institute (TPRI), the Academy of Transportation Science, the Waterborne Transport Research Institute and the Research Institute of Highway (RIOH) visited Berlin and Hamburg from October 23rd to 26th in order to gain first-hand experience and exchange on transport and climate change strategies. The Sino-German Cooperation on Low Carbon Transport (CLCT) project, commissioned by the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMUB), organized the “Mitigating Climate Change in the Transport Sector” study tour program. Part of the visit was a meeting with BMUB to discuss Germany’s transport and climate action plans and to exchange on national GHG mitigation policies and measures in the transport sector. Through meetings with the Hamburg Port Authority and the Hamburg transport alliance (Hamburger Verkehrsverbund (HVV)), the participants gained an insight into local and mode…

The transport sector is responsible for a great share of energy consumption, which directly correlates with the emission of polluting greenhouse gases (GHG) and therefore indirectly with climate change. Within this scope, road freight transportation accounts for the largest share of total GHG emissions from transport. In Europe, in 2010, transport sector was responsible for 33 % of final energy consumption and 26 % of greenhouse gas emissions. Correlating, road transportation accounted for 72 % of total GHG emissions from transport. In China, in 2013, 14.19 million commercial road freight vehicles carried a total volume of 30.7 billion tonnes of freight with a turnover volume of 55.7 trillion ton kilometres. All of these figures grew with annual rates of over 10 % in the last years in China. Projections suggest that due to the development in e-commerce and globalisation road freight transport will increase significantly in the next few years. As a consequence of…

Individual motorised transport in Beijing has increased strongly over the last years. In order to identify appropriate measures to minimise air pollution, congestion and global emissions, the Transport Demand Management Project developed a model to quantify transport related emissions. China’s economic growth over the last three decades has had numerous positive effects, but it has also led to a tremendous increase of individual motorised transport. In Beijing, the stock of 5 million cars increases air pollution, congestion, parking problems as well as the number of accidents. The strong growth of individual motorised transport and its negative effects, including rising GHG emissions, have become a growing challenge for Beijing and other large cities in China. In order to assess the emissions impact in Beijing, GIZ, its partners at the Beijing Transportation Research Center (BTRC), and the Swiss INFRAS Institute developed an emission modelling database and model to quantify GHG emissions from…

The GIZ Green Logistics project advises Chinese partners such as the Ministry of Transport (MoT) in the field of carbon foot printing in logistics. The project contributes to capacity development of decision makers and the introduction of new concepts and standards. Within this context the DSLV guide was translated into Chinese to outline the European approach to local partners and to provide a resource document. Manage carbon emissions from logistics is a complex task and a major challenge for reducing energy consumption of the freight transport industry. The European Committee for Standardization (CEN) approached this problem by introducing the CEN standard EN 16258, “Methodology for Calculation and Declaration of Energy Consumption and GHG Emissions of Transport Services (freight and passengers)” at the beginning of 2013 to quantify the environmental foot print of logistic activities. The standard provides a common methodology for the calculation, declaration and reporting on energy use and…

Until 2017 Beijing is going to replace 80 per cent of its bus fleet to make its public transport system more environmentally friendly. Wang Hao of Beijing’s Commission of Transport stated on 13th December 2013 that it was their aim “to continuously reduce automobile emissions in downtown areas of the capital, while easing traffic congestion”. Consequently the Commission not only plans to replace old buses, but also pledged to further develop bus routes and achieve a modal shift of commuters from private cars to public transport. Beijing plans to reduce its nitrogen dioxide emissions by 50 percent and particulate matter by 60 percent during the target period. To reach the goal, 13,825 buses shall be replaced by 4,058 electrically powered and 7,185 natural gas buses. A large share of electrically powered buses is planned to be trolleybuses. Xu Kangming of Beijing Public Transport Holding pointed out, that trolley buses had…

Cities need a reliable and comfortable transport system. As a backbone of economic and social development, mobility of people and goods needs to be environmentally friendly. Today, the transport sector is the fastest growing source of emissions, making low carbon transport development a central concern for a sustainable future worldwide. Hosted by the Ministry of Transport and the National Development and Reform Commission, GIZ and its implementation partner the China Urban Sustainable Transport Research Centre (CUSTReC) organised a 3-day training on sustainable low carbon transport, in which international experts shared and explained their experiences.. It addressed mainly transport department officials of municipalities and gave them a broad introduction in planning an integrated and less carbon intensive transport system. “Agenda Training on Low Carbon Transport” “Introduction into the Trainining on Low Carbon Transport” “Keynote Low Carbon Transport” Covering topics from strategic planning, emission quantification, policy implementation and financing it gave an…