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The 3rd World Transport Convention (WTC 2019) took place from 13-16 June in Beijing under the theme “Green and Intelligent Mobility for Future Transport”. The WTC 2019, which was organized by the China Highway and Transportation Society (CHTS), provided a platform to international organizations and academics as well as more than 6,000 participants and 50,000 visitors to debate, share experiences, and to explore collaboration potentials. The programme included various keynote speeches, a transport expo as well as more than 600 technical sessions and 60 forums focusing on topics such as non-motorized and smart transportation, shared mobility, and autonomous driving. The Sino-German Cooperation on Low Carbon Transportation project (CLCT) supported the WTC 2019 with co-organizing panels on the topics of urban cycling, Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS), green and smart ports as well as Sustainable Urban Mobility Planning (SUMP). Urban Cycling – Key to People-oriented Mobility Mr. Jörg Thiemann-Linden, traffic planner, designated…

Facing rapid urbanisation and economic growth in the last decades, the transport sector has become the fastest growing consumer of fossil fuels and the fastest growing source of GHG emissions in China. At the same time, the Chinese government has addressed the topic of climate protection as an increasingly important policy issue over the past years. Now, strong capacities have to be built in the relevant institutions at national, provincial and municipal level to develop, implement and monitor strategies, policies and measures to mitigate climate change. Together with the local implementation partner, the China Academy of Transportation Sciences (CATS), one of the leading think tanks of China’s Ministry of Transport (MoT), the Sino-German cooperation on Low Carbon Transport (CLCT) project, implemented by GIZ, is conducting a study on a roadmap for China’s low carbon transport development and scenario evaluation. The study is funded by the International Climate Initiative (IKI) of the…

The development of electric vehicles (EVs, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) and battery electric vehicles (BEVs)) could enhance fuel diversity and utilise renewable energy, which is considered a promising, long-term solution to reduce high dependence on fossil fuels and alleviate climate change impacts from a global perspective. In addition, EV deployment is considered capable of improving urban air quality by reducing on-road emissions for traffic-populated areas. Chinese policymakers are aware of the potential environmental benefits of EVs in lessening urban atmospheric pollution. Decade-long discussions regarding whether fleet electrification can deliver actual environmental benefits on a regional scale have been heated during recent years. Life cycle assessment (LCA) methods were applied to determine the well-to-wheels (WTW) reduction benefits of energy consumption and emissions of greenhouse gases and air pollutants through electro-mobility. During the initial phase of the project, the full life cycle energy consumption and emissions of CO2 and major air…

Supported by the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH and the Shanghai Municipal Transportation Commission, the “New Energy Transportation International Forum”, co-hosted by Shanghai Transportation Trade Association and Shine Consultant, was successfully held in Shanghai on 10th and 11th January 2017. Mobility and transport are the backbone of a country’s society. From a global perspective, the entire transportation sector (passenger and freight transport) is responsible for nearly one quarter of all CO2 emissions. Even though countries such as Germany, for example, achieved significant efficiency improvements in the past (e. g. reduction in CO2 emissions per kilometer of passenger cars), the total greenhouse gas emissions within the sector have barely dropped due to an extensive rise in transport performance. This partially repeals the improvements already achieved in climate and environmental protection and shows that the absolute contribution to climate protection and the proportion of renewable energy use in the transport sector…

In the coming years, China will continue to experience a significant growth in its transport sector. Today already 120 million private vehicles are driving on Chinese roads. 35.000 are added on a daily basis. From 2000 to 2013 the freight volume increased from 13.6 to 45 billion tons. Already in 2011 the transport sector in China was responsible for 628 million tons of CO2. A figure that is almost four times higher than Germany’s total greenhouse gas emissions. Unlike most industrialised countries with high motorisation rates, China’s transport related emissions only amount to eight per cent of its overall GHG emissions. This does not only indicate a strong potential for growth but also highlights the global relevance of the Chinese transport sector. The continued growth of a fossil fuels intensive transport sector amplifies challenges in energy security, greenhouse gas emissions and health-affecting pollution. Although fossil fuels dominate the Chinese transport…

Monetary purchasing subsidies, super credits, tax exemptions and local incentives for industry and consumers: China is sparing no efforts in its drive towards market expansion for e-mobility. The motives of China’s industrial policy are straightforward, yet environmental protection as a driver is not equally unambiguous. Prevalent coal-fired electricity production is sparking doubts whether an electrification of motorised individual mobility has a positive impact on the climate. A Sino-German cooperation project addresses these issues by assessing the environmental impact of electric vehicles in China. As an important economic driver in China, the automotive sector is a significant provider of employment and shapes technological innovation. It has significantly contributed to China’s unprecedented economic growth over the past decades. Conversely, daunting climate and environmental concerns have cast a shadow on this development. Air pollution, noise, accidents, congestion – the list of very tangible, negative external effects of transport is long. Less perceptible, but…

On June 30 China submitted its Intended Nationally Determined Contribution (INDC) that describes the climate change commitments to the climate conference in Paris in December 2015. It also outlines that actions are taken in the transport sector. General Commitment (page 5) “Based on its national circumstances, development stage, sustainable development strategy and international responsibility, China has nationally determined its actions by 2030 as follows: • To achieve the peaking of carbon dioxide emissions around 2030 and making best efforts to peak early; • To lower carbon dioxide emissions per unit of GDP by 60%to 65% from the 2005 level; • To increase the share of non-fossil fuels in primary energy consumption to around 20%; and • To increase the forest stock volume by around 4.5 billion cubic meters on the 2005 level. Actions in the transport sector (page 9): “Controlling Emissions from Transportation Sectors • To develop a green and…

“Air quality in German cities is as high as the air quality in rural areas 20 years ago. We reduced carbon monoxide (CO) by 90 per cent, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) by 90 per cent, benzene by more than 95 per cent, nitrogen oxides by 90 per cent and particulate matter by 70 per cent. This means we achieved a massive reduction of air pollution in Germany.” says Dr.-Ing. Axel Friedrich (Technical Chemist from the Technical University of Berlin), who contributed an interview to the publication “Clean Air – Made in Germany”. Published by the German Partnership for Sustainable Mobility (GPSM) “Clean Air – Made in Germany” informs about stakeholders, legal initiatives and measures which contribute to the high level of air quality in Germany. As traffic is a main contributor to air pollution, special emphasis is given to what can be done to reduce pollutant emissions from the transport…

As a continuation of traffic restricting measures introduced during the Olympic Games in 2008, the municipal government of Beijing strictly banned heavy polluting vehicles from driving inside of the capital’s 5th ring road. The heavy-polluting vehicles are vehicles that fail to meet the Euro I emission standard, which China adopted as “China I” in 1992. Generally they are referred to as “yellow-label vehicles”. According to the Beijing Environmental Protection Bureau, a single yellow label vehicle generates emissions equal to that of 28 low-emission Euro IV-compliant vehicles. In October 2009, 10 months after the introduction of the yellow-label vehicle ban, the restricted area was extended to Beijing’s 6th ring road. Reducing the number of heavy-polluting vehicles is one of the city’s top priorities until today and different measures are undertaken to clean up the air in Beijing. Among others, it is discussed to further develop the existing Low Emission Zone (LEZ) beyond yellow-label…

Individual motorised transport in Beijing has increased strongly over the last years. In order to identify appropriate measures to minimise air pollution, congestion and global emissions, the Transport Demand Management Project developed a model to quantify transport related emissions. China’s economic growth over the last three decades has had numerous positive effects, but it has also led to a tremendous increase of individual motorised transport. In Beijing, the stock of 5 million cars increases air pollution, congestion, parking problems as well as the number of accidents. The strong growth of individual motorised transport and its negative effects, including rising GHG emissions, have become a growing challenge for Beijing and other large cities in China. In order to assess the emissions impact in Beijing, GIZ, its partners at the Beijing Transportation Research Center (BTRC), and the Swiss INFRAS Institute developed an emission modelling database and model to quantify GHG emissions from…