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The “10th China Urban Development and Planning Conference” was held on 22nd and 23rd of July 2015 supported by Ministry of Housing and Urban Rural Development (MoHURD) and jointly organised by Chinese Society for Urban Studies and Municipal government of Guangzhou. More than 1000 participants discussed topics of urban planning and sustainable development, new-type urbanization, low-carbon & eco-city and city development transformation. As part of the conference GIZ and the Chinese Society for Urban Studies jointly organised a session on Green Urban Transport. GIZ project manager Sun Shengyang presented examples from Europe regarding the role of transport in sustainable urbanisation. Other experts from AURP, City of Stockholm and China Sustainable Transport Research Center shared experiences on transit-oriented development, congestion charging, non-motorized transport and sustainable urban transport strategies. For more information about Sustainable Urban Transport in China please click here. Contact: shengyang.sun@giz.de Presentations can be downloaded below: “Challenges and Answers: The…

With the Clean Air Action Plan of 2013 Beijing started the discussion on introducing congestion charging to reduce traffic volume, relieve congestion and subsequently transport related air pollution. With the support of GIZ, the Beijing Transportation Research Centre modelled the impact of different congestion charging policy schemes. While Beijing is still discussing the feasibility of congestion charging, few prominent cities around the world have implemented it. Stockholm, London, Singapore, Milan are some of the cities that are currently operating a congestion charging scheme as an economic instrument to reduce congestion and its detrimental effects. Forty years after its first implementation, congestion charging remains a highly underused policy, even if implemented policies have shown to be highly successful. The international experts involved in assessing the congestion charging policy for Beijing have summarised their experience with congestion charging in a policy guide. The guide attempts to address the two main reasons why…

Learning from international experience in urban transport policy and discussing their relevance for Chinese cities was the main topic of the Urban Transport Development Forum in Beijing. The forum was organised by the Chinese Ministry of Transport, the World Bank and GIZ. The first day on 10th March 2015 focussed on the question how sustainable urban transport policy can be implemented successfully. Dr. Friedemann Kunst (former Head of Transportation Department, Berlin State Senate) presented Berlin’s strategic approach to urban transport planning. He stressed that transport policy in Germany has come a long way: “Since the late 1990s cities in Germany have realised that it is impossible to combine the ideas of a car-friendly city and a city that is attractive and resource-efficient.” The turnaround, with an increase in environmental friendly transport modes was only possible through a participatory planning process that managed to create a unique commitment to sustainable transport…

As a mega city with over 20 million people and 5 million motor vehicles shuttling the city, Beijing bears the brunt of traffic congestion and other constraints of urban development. It is imperative to integrate transport with city planning and environmental protection. Air pollution and congestion are two of the most urgent problems calling for attention. As a result, both an enhanced low emission zone in Beijing and congestion charging are being assessed as potential policy options. Often mentioned in the same breath, low emission zones and congestion charging schemes are in fact two very different policies with entirely different policy objectives. Whereas the primary aim of low emission zones is compliance with pollution standards (better air quality), the central aim of congestion charging is to reduce congestion and gain public revenue that can be reinvested in public transport systems. At the moment, Beijing Transport Research Center (BTRC) commissioned by…

In February 2014, hazardous smog in Beijing once more made headlines across the world. Particulate matter measurements (PM2.5) temporarily exceeded the 25 micrograms 24-hour mean considered safe by the World Health Organization by 15 times. For one day Beijing’s authorities raised its air pollution alert to orange, the second highest of the four-tiered system. To tackle the repeating smog events, Beijing released its Clean Air Action Plan last autumn, outlining the introduction of a congestion charge and an expansion of the low emission zone policy in Beijing. According to current estimates, the transport sector accounts for approximately 22% of Beijing’s PM2.5 air pollution. To remove highly polluting vehicles from Beijing’s roads a Low Emission Zone (LEZ) within in the 5th ring road was implemented for vehicles that cannot meet the Euro I emission standard (so called yellow label vehicles) in 2009. With the start of this year the zone was…

With the Chinese New Year festival starting tomorrow Beijing looks back on the year of the snake. In 2013 transport has been an important topic in Beijing. Citizens and policy makers discussed new ideas how to tackle transport-related problems since traffic congestion and air pollution remain prevailing issues. As 2013 started with hazardous smog for consecutive days, echoing in headlines across the world, special attention was given to measures handling the basic course. At the top, Beijing’s five-year Clean Air Action Plan (2013-2017) was unveiled in September 2013. Transport-related policies are a key element of the plan. Beijing’s authorities will continue their traffic restricting policies as well as advance the promotion of vehicle fuel efficiency and environmental performance. The plan states 84 specific tasks with more than 30 responsible bodies involved to clear up the city’s sky. Transport-related measures that were discussed and implemented in Beijing in 2013 comprise a broad…

The Parking Charge Policy workshop was hosted by Shenzhen Municipal Commission of Transport on February 28, 2013. With more than 80 participants, including representatives from Financing Bureau, Traffic Management Bureau, Development and Reform Commision and related research institutions, consulting companies and medias, the workshop was characterized by a great mixture of knowledge. Daniel Bongardt from GIZ China presented International TDM Policies and Good practice, followed by Paul Barter (picture) from Singapore who introduced into Some Lessons on Parking Policy in Asian Cities. Check this out: Further  information about urban transport and electro mobility in China.