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Systematic and integrated transport planning is key to achieving low-carbon transport systems in cities. Sustainable Urban Mobility Planning can help cities to overcome institutional barriers by shifting from comprehensive transport planning with a focus on infrastructure towards integrated and climate-friendly mobility planning. On 25 April 2019, GIZ, together with the Institute for Environment and Sustainable Development (IESD), the Yinchuan Development and Reform Commission, the Yinchuan Foreign Affairs Office, and various local government departments, jointly organized a one-day technical workshop in the Chinese city of Yinchuan on the concept of SUMP. The aim of the workshop was to jointly elaborate on how SUMP can contribute to a more sustainable development of Yinchuan’s transport and mobility system and to conduct an in-depth exchange on the status quo of Yinchuan’s transport system and its future development pathway. Yinchuan, a forerunner in innovation and sustainable urban development Yinchuan, the capital of the Ningxia Hui…

With the fast-paced development of the Chinese logistics sector and the booming Chinese freight industry, road   and highway freight volume have been growing 5.9% (to 8.19 billion tonnes) and 10.2% year-on-year respectively. To fully understand the transportation and logistics sector’s environmental and climate impact, systematically calculating, assessing and reporting the carbon footprint of the sector are crucial. The development of sound, comprehensive and accurate calculation tools and practices will greatly contribute to achieving a green and low-carbon transport sector in China and to meeting the country’s commitment of peaking carbon emissions around the year 2030. Aiming at creating a better understanding of the current system for calculating emissions of the Chinese logistics industry, to introduce effective tools and methodologies, and to exchange on best practices from Europe and China, the Smart Freight Forum – Logistics Emission Calculation Tools and Practice was held on 27 March 2019 in Beijing.  The forum…

With the rapid growth of vehicle populations, Chinese cities are facing parking challenges. In the past, cities tended to solve parking problems simply by increasing supply, for example, by converting more curb lanes and sidewalks into parking spaces, by subsidizing the construction of municipal parking facilities and by increasing the number of parking spaces required in new development. In recent years, many cities have started to apply a new parking-planning paradigm to enhance efficient parking management. Parking management was seen as an important TDM (Transportation Demand Management) instrument to mitigate urban traffic congestion and to reduce GHG emissions. Against this background, from June 19 to 23, the “Sino-German Cooperation on Low Carbon Transport” project (CLCT) and the “Sustainable Urban Transport Program” (SUTP) jointly organized a parking management training course for the city of Tianjin and the city of Qingdao. Both cities are facing escalating parking problems and a lack of…

On June 26th, 2017, the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH, together with the Royal Norwegian Embassy to China and the China Carbon Forum co-organised an event titled “Mitigating transport emissions: European and Chinese perspectives”. The event was part of the China Low Carbon Leadership Network (LCLN), an event series jointly organized by GIZ and the China Carbon Forum since 2010, aiming to encourage communication among leading local and international experts in China’s climate change sector. The event was opened with a keynote speech by Mr. Vidar Helgesen, the Norwegian Minister for Climate and Environment. Mr. Helgesen began with pointing out that decarbonisation of the transport sector in Norway is a very pressing issue, given the fact that it accounts for about a quarter of Norway’s energy-related greenhouse gas emissions. The transport sector also contributes to local air quality problems, while road traffic poses as a major source of micro-plastic…

Facing rapid urbanisation and economic growth in the last decades, the transport sector has become the fastest growing consumer of fossil fuels and the fastest growing source of GHG emissions in China. At the same time, the Chinese government has addressed the topic of climate protection as an increasingly important policy issue over the past years. Now, strong capacities have to be built in the relevant institutions at national, provincial and municipal level to develop, implement and monitor strategies, policies and measures to mitigate climate change. Together with the local implementation partner, the China Academy of Transportation Sciences (CATS), one of the leading think tanks of China’s Ministry of Transport (MoT), the Sino-German cooperation on Low Carbon Transport (CLCT) project, implemented by GIZ, is conducting a study on a roadmap for China’s low carbon transport development and scenario evaluation. The study is funded by the International Climate Initiative (IKI) of the…

The development of electric vehicles (EVs, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) and battery electric vehicles (BEVs)) could enhance fuel diversity and utilise renewable energy, which is considered a promising, long-term solution to reduce high dependence on fossil fuels and alleviate climate change impacts from a global perspective. In addition, EV deployment is considered capable of improving urban air quality by reducing on-road emissions for traffic-populated areas. Chinese policymakers are aware of the potential environmental benefits of EVs in lessening urban atmospheric pollution. Decade-long discussions regarding whether fleet electrification can deliver actual environmental benefits on a regional scale have been heated during recent years. Life cycle assessment (LCA) methods were applied to determine the well-to-wheels (WTW) reduction benefits of energy consumption and emissions of greenhouse gases and air pollutants through electro-mobility. During the initial phase of the project, the full life cycle energy consumption and emissions of CO2 and major air…

The Chinese State Council released a Work Plan for Controlling Greenhouse Gas Emission during the 13th Five-Year Plan Period (2016-2020) last month. This plan is designed to ensure the completion of the low-carbon development tasks identified in the 13th national five-year plan and to achieve the peaking of carbon dioxide emissions around 2030 and making the best efforts to peak early. The key objectives by 2020 are to lower carbon dioxide emission per GDP unit by 18% of 2015 emission level. By 2020, carbon dioxide emission per turnover unit of commercial truck, coach, and ship will be respectively reduced by 8%, 2.6%, and 7% in comparison to 2015 levels. The carbon dioxide emission of urban passenger transport per unit volume will be reduced by 12.5% compared to 2015. The key measures to be taken to achieve those goals are: 1. Lower carbon emission in the transport industry and save energy…

The Chinese economy has continuously seen rapid growth over the past years, which has led to a unique increase in passenger and freight traffic volumes. Every day, 35,000 vehicles are joining more than 120 million existing passenger cars on Chinese roads. Notwithstanding the undoubted significant role of the transport sector to support economic development, the subsequent environmental consequences are severe. In Beijing, for instance, approx. 25-30% of pollutants are emitted by mobile on-road emissions. Hence, the central and local governments are keen on adopting necessary measures in order to lower mobile source emissions. Understanding the source of the problem is key in developing adequate policy measures. This is why the Vehicle Emission Control Centre (VECC) of the Chinese Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP) together with the Sino-German project on Low Carbon Transport and the Environmental Partnership organised a two day workshop from 3rd to 4th March 2016 on Mobile Source…

The transport sector is responsible for a great share of energy consumption, which directly correlates with the emission of polluting greenhouse gases (GHG) and therefore indirectly with climate change. Within this scope, road freight transportation accounts for the largest share of total GHG emissions from transport. In Europe, in 2010, transport sector was responsible for 33 % of final energy consumption and 26 % of greenhouse gas emissions. Correlating, road transportation accounted for 72 % of total GHG emissions from transport. In China, in 2013, 14.19 million commercial road freight vehicles carried a total volume of 30.7 billion tonnes of freight with a turnover volume of 55.7 trillion ton kilometres. All of these figures grew with annual rates of over 10 % in the last years in China. Projections suggest that due to the development in e-commerce and globalisation road freight transport will increase significantly in the next few years. As a consequence of…

It is not new that China currently is undergoing rapid urbanisation processes. Hence, it is essential for the populous Chinese cities to develop comprehensive and integrated public transport networks in order to cope with the continuously increasing mobility demand. However, this results in additional financial burdens, which in many cases are challenging to overcome. It is even more difficult when such additional expenditures have to be undertaken by local authorities, which in most of the cases depend on the national budget. The question of how to finance urban public transport is critical in the Chinese context, as the national budget law, the major financing mechanism for public transport in China, cannot meet the cities’ demand for sustainable funding anymore. In order to take a step forward towards changing the way the public transport sector requests and receives funds, China Urban Sustainable Transport Research Centre (CUSTReC) organised a workshop on “Sustainable…