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GHG Emissions

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Monetary purchasing subsidies, super credits, tax exemptions and local incentives for industry and consumers: China is sparing no efforts in its drive towards market expansion for e-mobility. The motives of China’s industrial policy are straightforward, yet environmental protection as a driver is not equally unambiguous. Prevalent coal-fired electricity production is sparking doubts whether an electrification of motorised individual mobility has a positive impact on the climate. A Sino-German cooperation project addresses these issues by assessing the environmental impact of electric vehicles in China. As an important economic driver in China, the automotive sector is a significant provider of employment and shapes technological innovation. It has significantly contributed to China’s unprecedented economic growth over the past decades. Conversely, daunting climate and environmental concerns have cast a shadow on this development. Air pollution, noise, accidents, congestion – the list of very tangible, negative external effects of transport is long. Less perceptible, but…

On June 30 China submitted its Intended Nationally Determined Contribution (INDC) that describes the climate change commitments to the climate conference in Paris in December 2015. It also outlines that actions are taken in the transport sector. General Commitment (page 5) “Based on its national circumstances, development stage, sustainable development strategy and international responsibility, China has nationally determined its actions by 2030 as follows: • To achieve the peaking of carbon dioxide emissions around 2030 and making best efforts to peak early; • To lower carbon dioxide emissions per unit of GDP by 60%to 65% from the 2005 level; • To increase the share of non-fossil fuels in primary energy consumption to around 20%; and • To increase the forest stock volume by around 4.5 billion cubic meters on the 2005 level. Actions in the transport sector (page 9): “Controlling Emissions from Transportation Sectors • To develop a green and…

Already since 2013 GIZ, the Shenzhen Urban Transport Planning Center (SZUTPC) and Shenzhen Municipal Commission of Transport (SZMCT) jointly worked on reforming parking pricing in Shenzhen. International parking expert Paul Barter supported local transport planners to evaluate the effects of the parking price policy and assisted the project team in improving the actual policy design. On-street parking management has been implemented in four pilot zones in the city center of Shenzhen since July 2014. After an operation period of several months, Shenzhen Urban Transport Planning Center (SUTPC) conducted an evaluation on impacts of the on-street parking management policy in Futian CBD, Nanshan CBD, Tianbei and Zhuzilin and published key findings of the evaluation report on the social media platform Wechat and local newspaper Shenzhen online. Right before the evaluation started, four areas adjacent to the pilot zones with similar land use and parking problems have been identified as referential areas…

Last week the “China Green Freight Initiative International Seminar” organised by the China Road Transport Association (CRTA) took place in Beijing. The China Green Freight Initiative (CGFI) was launched in April 2012 as a national programme to improve fuel efficiency and reduce CO2 and air pollutant emissions from road freight transport in China. Overall aims are to adopt cleaner technologies and smarter freight management practices. GIZ works with the Chinese Ministry of Transport on low carbon freight transport. Within this context, GIZ supports the CGFI and participated in the annual seminar with other renowned international speakers such as Jim Blubaugh, Director International Programs Office of Transportation and Air Quality United States Environmental Protection Agency, and his colleague Buddy Polovick, SmartWay Transport Partnership. For more information please take a look at the agenda: “CGFI Seminar 2014 Agenda” The GIZ China “Green Logistics in China” project contributed to the seminar with two presentations.…

Individual motorised transport in Beijing has increased strongly over the last years. In order to identify appropriate measures to minimise air pollution, congestion and global emissions, the Transport Demand Management Project developed a model to quantify transport related emissions. China’s economic growth over the last three decades has had numerous positive effects, but it has also led to a tremendous increase of individual motorised transport. In Beijing, the stock of 5 million cars increases air pollution, congestion, parking problems as well as the number of accidents. The strong growth of individual motorised transport and its negative effects, including rising GHG emissions, have become a growing challenge for Beijing and other large cities in China. In order to assess the emissions impact in Beijing, GIZ, its partners at the Beijing Transportation Research Center (BTRC), and the Swiss INFRAS Institute developed an emission modelling database and model to quantify GHG emissions from…

The Chinese Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT) published the proposal for the phase 4 fuel economy standard (FES) on January 21, 2014 and it is available for commenting. It regulates, similar to the US CAFE and the European CO2-Standard, the fuel consumption of domestically manufactured and imported passenger vehicles for the years 2016 through to 2020. Under the new rule, the overall fleet-average fuel consumption is projected to be 5.0L/100km by 2020 as measured by the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC). Compared to the Phase 3 standard, which sets the target for the corporate-average fuel consumption (CAFC) to 6.9L/100km, the new consumption target is 28 percent lower.  In addition to CAFC targets, the proposal sets vehicle-specific limits to individual car consumption. Both standards have to be met by the manufacturers and importers. Similar to the current third phase, the proposal incorporates extra credits for new-energy vehicles (battery-electric, fuel…

Last week the Chinese government altered the subsidy scheme for new energy vehicles (NEVs). Linked to the second phase of the national EV development programme, the aim of the scheme is to drive the domestic NEV market and to increase the share of environmentally friendly cars on Chinese roads. In 2013 the Chinese government renewed the policy for NEVs granting subsidies ranging from up to 35,000 yuan for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and up to 60,000 yuan for fully electric-powered vehicles. New-energy buses and coaches are subsidized with up to 500,000 yuan per vehicle. Originally, the government had anticipated to lower NEV subsidies by 10% in 2014 and 20% in 2015. However, this plan has now been adjusted and subsidies will only be lowered by 5% in 2014 and 10% in 2015. Furthermore, the NEV subsidy policy is not anticipated to cease at the end of 2015 as originally planned…

Friday, 29th November 2013 GIZ organised an international exchange workshop between Beijing’s Transport Authorities and international experts on an intended white paper “Opportunities and Challenges for Beijing Transport Development”. The new white paper, issued by Beijing Municipal Committee of Transport (BMCT) is planned to cover the new challenges emerging from the continuous growth of Beijing and the consequently increasing travel demand. During the meeting BTRC gave a presentation about the main challenges addressed in the white paper. The first topic addressed was the road usage rate. Zhou Ling of BTRCs Strategy Department emphasised that Beijing has not only a higher vehicle ownership in its central areas than most other cities worldwide, but also twice as much car kilometres travelled than for example Tokyo. Most striking, 44% of the trips are below 5 kilometres and could therefore be easily replaced by cycling or public transport. That could also relief the cities…

A rapid growth in transport demand and related Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions become a growing challenge for China. To reduce the dependency on oil and to protect the environment, the country’s government promotes electric vehicles. But as Chinas power market is still relying on fossil fuels, the environmental impacts of electric mobility remain uncertain. As more electric vehicles mean a higher power demand, it is essential to understand the interaction with the power sector. To gain comprehensive insights into the Chinese electricity market a workshop was carried out to evaluate the status quo and future development of the power generation system in China. As a result the potential interactions between electric mobility and power sector were identified. Having had inputs from Chinese, as well as German expert the workshop provided interesting insights into the electricity sectors of China and Germany against the background of the introduction of EVs. Although the…

Not only in China but in all developing countries, the transport sectors share of greenhouse gas emission is growing rapidly. Therefore, this year’s Transport Day, a side event to COP 19 in Warsaw, Poland on 17th November 2013, aims to bring together the expert communities from both, the climate and the transport sector. With a promotion of an integration of transport in climate change policy making, the sector can be placed more prominent in the international debate. The event is organised by the Bridging the Gap Initiative (BtG) and the Partnership on Sustainable, Low Carbon Transport (SLoCaT). Daniel Bongardt of GIZ China is in charge of coordinating the stream of break-out sessions on Ensuring effective transport – Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs). Before Transport Day, GIZ TRANSfer project will host an expert workshop Towards Roadmaps for MRV of Transport NAMAs on 15th November 2013. The workshop will be the kick-off…