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The promotion of low-carbon and environmentally friendly transport is an important target of China’s development strategy for its transport sector. To reduce vehicle emissions in cities, it is key to develop effective and integrated emission monitoring and to standardize the methodology of emission inventories. In particular, the application of Big Data can help to establish a detailed and reliable real-time emission monitoring. For the integrated development of vehicle emission monitoring, verification and report (MRV) in China, collaboration between relevant stakeholders such as decision-makers on city level, research institutions and the industry as well as capacity development and technical expert exchange is needed. In 2013, the Shenzhen Municipal Transportation Commission and the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) signed a Memorandum of Understanding to support the Southern Chinese city of Shenzhen to alleviate urban traffic congestion and to establish a low-carbon transport system. The project…

GIZ in China has been working with the Chinese cities of Shenzhen and Foshan since 2012 on low-carbon transportation. From April 9 to 10, two GIZ experts (Dr. Christoph Nedopil and Shengyang Sun) and Benedikt Notter from INFRAS, a consultancy and engineering company based in Switzerland, travelled to Shenzhen to work with the Shenzhen Urban Transport Planning Center (SUTPC) on improving the accounting of greenhouse gases from road transportation in Shenzhen. In order to understand traffic flows, SUTPC currently collects about 750 million records of big data daily to monitor traffic flow (see also our interview with SUPTC about big data here). However, more information is necessary to quantify emissions from driving, which depend, amongst others, on the type of vehicle or whether a vehicle is stuck in a traffic jams or is driving at high-speeds. Thus, SUPTC has recorded about 7,000 hours of very detailed driving cycles from trucks…

In order to enable environmental authorities in Chinese cities to generate a regular emissions inventory of the transport sector, GIZ China published the guide “Monitoring Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions of Transport Activities in Chinese Cities – A Step-by-Step Guide to Data Collection”. The report was developed as an output for the TRANSfer project, which is implemented by GIZ and financed by the International Climate Initiative of the German Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conversation, Building and Nuclear Safety (BMUB). The guide provides a detailed approach for setting-up an emission monitoring system for urban passenger transport. Sensitive to both, the local traffic situations and data availability, the guide outlines three different approaches to calculate transport activities: The basic approach: Initial start on GHG monitoring. Calculations are mainly based on non-local default values but already allow a reasonable understanding of the sector; The advanced approach: Calculations are done with locally specific parameters…

Air pollution, congestion, traffic accidents – the list of negative effects of the constantly growing volume of vehicle traffic in Beijing is long. Despite several policies that restrict vehicle registration and usage, between 2010 and 2014 alone the number of private passenger cars in the Chinese capital Beijing grew from 4.5 to 5.6 million vehicles. This makes transport also a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. But during the same time the vehicle fleet growth rate also lowered from ten to three percent annually demonstrating some first success of urban transport policies in Beijing. One promising approach to reduce emissions is transport demand management (TDM) attempting to control demand through measures to reduce the need to travel by car (avoid) and move car drivers to sustainable modes (shift). It is an integral part of sustainable urban transport strategies and is complementary to better urban planning and clean vehicles. With the…

After the success of the Urban Transport Development Forum in early March, the exchange on low carbon transport between Chinese and international experts continued during a two-day conference and training in Beijing. On April 20th-21st, the Chinese Ministry of Transport, the World Bank and GIZ jointly organized the “Transport Emission Reduction Strategies and Quantification Conference and Training”. The two-day conference and training was split into four main sessions with different focuses: 1) Strategies of transport energy saving and emission reductions 2) Policies and measures of developing low carbon transport 3) Impact of new energy busses on energy savings and emission reductions; 4) Emission modelling and quantifications in transport sector. In the first session, beside the presentation on development of international low carbon transport by Fang Ke from World Bank and China national scenarios of low carbon transport by Huang Quansheng from Transport Planning and Research Institute under the Chinese Ministry…