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Low Carbon Transport

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Systematic and integrated transport planning is key to achieving low-carbon transport systems in cities. Sustainable Urban Mobility Planning can help cities to overcome institutional barriers by shifting from comprehensive transport planning with a focus on infrastructure towards integrated and climate-friendly mobility planning. On 25 April 2019, GIZ, together with the Institute for Environment and Sustainable Development (IESD), the Yinchuan Development and Reform Commission, the Yinchuan Foreign Affairs Office, and various local government departments, jointly organized a one-day technical workshop in the Chinese city of Yinchuan on the concept of SUMP. The aim of the workshop was to jointly elaborate on how SUMP can contribute to a more sustainable development of Yinchuan’s transport and mobility system and to conduct an in-depth exchange on the status quo of Yinchuan’s transport system and its future development pathway. Yinchuan, a forerunner in innovation and sustainable urban development Yinchuan, the capital of the Ningxia Hui…

With the fast-paced development of the Chinese logistics sector and the booming Chinese freight industry, road   and highway freight volume have been growing 5.9% (to 8.19 billion tonnes) and 10.2% year-on-year respectively. To fully understand the transportation and logistics sector’s environmental and climate impact, systematically calculating, assessing and reporting the carbon footprint of the sector are crucial. The development of sound, comprehensive and accurate calculation tools and practices will greatly contribute to achieving a green and low-carbon transport sector in China and to meeting the country’s commitment of peaking carbon emissions around the year 2030. Aiming at creating a better understanding of the current system for calculating emissions of the Chinese logistics industry, to introduce effective tools and methodologies, and to exchange on best practices from Europe and China, the Smart Freight Forum – Logistics Emission Calculation Tools and Practice was held on 27 March 2019 in Beijing.  The forum…

China Transport Sector Policy Briefing – 2019, Issue 1 The newest issue of our China Transport Sector Policy Briefing is here! The Sustainable Mobility Team at GIZ in China provides you with regular summaries of new important policies in China’s transport sector. Please click here to download: China Transport Sector Policy Briefing Issue 1 2019 In the beginning of 2019, the Chinese government is planning to strengthen China’s automotive industry, with a focus on ICV and NEV industries, while curbing pollution caused by diesel trucks. Strengthening the automotive industries, restrictions over diesel trucks Based on the “Implementation Plan on Improving and Promoting the Consumption System (2018-2020)”, NDRC on 29 January 2019 released an “Implementation Scheme on Supply-Side Measures for Further Promoting Steady Growth of Consumption and Forming a Robust Domestic Market (2019)”. The scheme sets forth a series of measures to stimulate consumption and to upgrade the industry structure in…

Co-authored with Sandra Retzer. Over the past decades, the People’s Republic of China not only underwent rapid urbanization and an impressive socio-economic transformation but also a tremendous de­velopment of its transport infrastructure. Today China has the longest high-speed railway network and has just brought its 350 km/h Fuxing (复兴 – renaissance) bullet train back on line, connecting Beijing and Shanghai (1,300km) with just four and a half hours of travel time. The same impressive de­velopment counts equally for the expansion of China`s high­way, aviation, shipping and public urban transport system. However, along with progress came challenges. Today, the transport sector is also associated with traffic congestion and clogged cities, this accounts for the high shares of carbon emissions and is a significant source of noise and (urban) air pollution with up to 30 percent shares of particulate matters in some of the big cities. The Chinese government is aware of…

On June 26th, 2017, the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH, together with the Royal Norwegian Embassy to China and the China Carbon Forum co-organised an event titled “Mitigating transport emissions: European and Chinese perspectives”. The event was part of the China Low Carbon Leadership Network (LCLN), an event series jointly organized by GIZ and the China Carbon Forum since 2010, aiming to encourage communication among leading local and international experts in China’s climate change sector. The event was opened with a keynote speech by Mr. Vidar Helgesen, the Norwegian Minister for Climate and Environment. Mr. Helgesen began with pointing out that decarbonisation of the transport sector in Norway is a very pressing issue, given the fact that it accounts for about a quarter of Norway’s energy-related greenhouse gas emissions. The transport sector also contributes to local air quality problems, while road traffic poses as a major source of micro-plastic…

Facing rapid urbanisation and economic growth in the last decades, the transport sector has become the fastest growing consumer of fossil fuels and the fastest growing source of GHG emissions in China. At the same time, the Chinese government has addressed the topic of climate protection as an increasingly important policy issue over the past years. Now, strong capacities have to be built in the relevant institutions at national, provincial and municipal level to develop, implement and monitor strategies, policies and measures to mitigate climate change. Together with the local implementation partner, the China Academy of Transportation Sciences (CATS), one of the leading think tanks of China’s Ministry of Transport (MoT), the Sino-German cooperation on Low Carbon Transport (CLCT) project, implemented by GIZ, is conducting a study on a roadmap for China’s low carbon transport development and scenario evaluation. The study is funded by the International Climate Initiative (IKI) of the…

The United Nations Climate Change Conference –COP21– in Paris end of 2015 and the preparations for the 13th Five-Year Plan (FYP) have shaped the discussion on transport policies in China for the last year. In this context, China’s president Xi Jinping announced plans for comprehensive measures to develop a low carbon transport sector within the timeframe of the 13th FYP from 2016-2020. During his opening speech Xi Jinping stated that “China will, on the basis of technological and institutional innovation, adopt new policy measures to improve the industrial mix, build low-carbon energy systems, develop green building and low-carbon transportation, and build a nation-wide carbon emission trading market so as to foster a new pattern of modernisation featuring harmony between man and nature”. Developments in 2015 Before talking about the implications of COP21 and the 13th FYP for China, let us have a brief look at the developments of China’s transport…

The transport sector is responsible for a great share of energy consumption, which directly correlates with the emission of polluting greenhouse gases (GHG) and therefore indirectly with climate change. Within this scope, road freight transportation accounts for the largest share of total GHG emissions from transport. In Europe, in 2010, transport sector was responsible for 33 % of final energy consumption and 26 % of greenhouse gas emissions. Correlating, road transportation accounted for 72 % of total GHG emissions from transport. In China, in 2013, 14.19 million commercial road freight vehicles carried a total volume of 30.7 billion tonnes of freight with a turnover volume of 55.7 trillion ton kilometres. All of these figures grew with annual rates of over 10 % in the last years in China. Projections suggest that due to the development in e-commerce and globalisation road freight transport will increase significantly in the next few years. As a consequence of…

Air pollution, congestion, traffic accidents – the list of negative effects of the constantly growing volume of vehicle traffic in Beijing is long. Despite several policies that restrict vehicle registration and usage, between 2010 and 2014 alone the number of private passenger cars in the Chinese capital Beijing grew from 4.5 to 5.6 million vehicles. This makes transport also a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. But during the same time the vehicle fleet growth rate also lowered from ten to three percent annually demonstrating some first success of urban transport policies in Beijing. One promising approach to reduce emissions is transport demand management (TDM) attempting to control demand through measures to reduce the need to travel by car (avoid) and move car drivers to sustainable modes (shift). It is an integral part of sustainable urban transport strategies and is complementary to better urban planning and clean vehicles. With the…

In the coming years, China will continue to experience a significant growth in its transport sector. Today already 120 million private vehicles are driving on Chinese roads. 35.000 are added on a daily basis. From 2000 to 2013 the freight volume increased from 13.6 to 45 billion tons. Already in 2011 the transport sector in China was responsible for 628 million tons of CO2. A figure that is almost four times higher than Germany’s total greenhouse gas emissions. Unlike most industrialised countries with high motorisation rates, China’s transport related emissions only amount to eight per cent of its overall GHG emissions. This does not only indicate a strong potential for growth but also highlights the global relevance of the Chinese transport sector. The continued growth of a fossil fuels intensive transport sector amplifies challenges in energy security, greenhouse gas emissions and health-affecting pollution. Although fossil fuels dominate the Chinese transport…