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urban delivery

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China has been struggling to meet the growing demands of urban delivery. With urban population continuously growing at about 15 million people per year, 58.52% of Chinese citizens now live in cities (up from 36.22% in 2000). At the same time, consumption spending per capita in China has grown by 25% in just 3 years from RMB 18,487 (about EUR 2,370) in 2013 to 23,079RMB (about EUR 2,960) in 2016. A lot of this increased consumption spending has been driving the fast growth of e-commerce, which saw a 60% annual growth (CAGR) for the past 7 years. These developments have provided a boom for logistics companies in China, which saw their express deliveries rise from 9 billion shipments in 2013 to an estimated 40 billion in 2018. However, this development also provides many challenges to both the traffic in the cities as well as the environment. With numbers of both…

On 11 November 2018 Chinese e-commerce volume reached more than 27 billion EUR, on a single day by a single retailer – Alibaba. This is more than half of Germany’s overall e-tailing in one year, which is expected to be 53.6 bn EUR in 2018. Adding other online-shops to the statistics, the total sum spent in Chinese e-commerce on that one day will probably be about as much as Germany’s yearly e-commerce volume (JD.com sold about 20 bn EUR worth of goods). The so called Singles Day, or Double Eleven (Shuangshiyi, 双十一) or also „chop-off-your-hands-day“ (in order to stop shopping) happens on 11 November. The four 1s could be understood as singles, which is one of the stories of the origin of Singles Day. It has become  the biggest shopping event in the world., dwarfing its American equivalent – Cyber Monday – which reached sales of 6.59 bn USD (about…

For four years in a row, China has been delivering the world’s largest express delivery volume, exceeding 40 billion consignments in 2017 (see here). In comparison: The German express delivery volume was projected to reach more than 3,3 billion for the same year (see here). As a result of a stronger Chinese e-commerce sector, the express delivery industry has been rapidly growing for a decade, which has consequently increased traffic volume. This has several negative effects on traffic as well as on the environment: Increased congestion causes noise pollution and affects air quality due to higher emissions, which in turn impacts urban Chinese living quality. In the “Provisional Regulations for Express Delivery in China”, the Chinese State Council stipulates guidelines to promote the domestic express delivery industry. While the regulations focuses on safe deliveries and improving the overall situation within this sector, the State Council also suggests various measures to…