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GIZ Sustainable Mobility in China

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We provide news, opinions and reports on policy and technology developments in the transport and mobility sector in China and around the world.

With a share of about 28 percent of global CO2-emissions, China is the world’s biggest emitter. With a total of 1.04 billion tons of CO2 in 2018[1], the transport sector in China accounts for about 10 percent of the country’s carbon emissions. Even though freight and logistics vehicles account for only about eight percent of the country’s total vehicle fleet, they account for approximately 70 percent of transport-related CO2-emissions. This makes the freight transport and logistics sector an important key element of the country’s roadmap to decarbonise transport – as part of China’s plan to reach carbon neutrality by 2060 and peak carbon emissions around 2030 while making best efforts to peak earlier. Annual total CO2 emissions, by world region, Source: Carbon Dioxide Analysis Center (CDIAC), Global Carbon Project (GCP) In recent years, freight volume in China has been increasing on average by almost 15 percent annually. The total freight…

China, once known as the kingdom of bicycles, has a long history of widespread bicycle usage. With growing urbanization, industrialization and popularization of alternative transport modes (such as subways), the status of the bicycle is at stake as usage is decreasing rapidly. However, the bicycle as a non-motorized transport mode is still a crucial vehicle to cover short and middle distances in urban and rural areas, with the further upside of low associated emissions and an increased quality of life. The following study starts by examining the general development of transport and systematic bicycle planning in China on a national level and is followed by a detailed analysis of the current bicycle systems and developments in six exemplary Chinese cities (Beijing, Hangzhou, Tianjin, Xiamen, Shenzhen and Zhangjiakou). Zhangjiakou is an important example here, as the Chinese government set the goal to transform the city‘s transport sector towards sustainability until the…

Transportation experts at MIT have developed new insights into how decision makers in hundreds of Chinese cities design and adopt policies relating to transportation — policies that could together curtail the rapidly growing demand for personal vehicles in China. Based on a mathematical analysis of historical data plus text analysis of policy reports, the team concludes that Chinese cities that have experienced similar urban development and motorization trends over time prioritize the same types of transportation policies to deal with their local conditions. Such a pattern is of interest to urban decision makers seeking role models for developing transportation policies. In addition to looking to Beijing and Shanghai — the trendsetters for innovative policymaking — decision makers can now learn by working with cities that face transportation challenges more similar to their own. The study Chinese cities have experienced diverse urbanization and motorization trends that present distinct challenges for municipal…

The newest issue of our China Transport Sector Policy Briefing is here! The Sustainable Mobility Team at GIZ in China provides you with regular summaries of important policies in China’s transport sector. Inside this issue of the China Transport Sector Policy Briefing Below, you will find Issue 3 of the China Transport Sector Policy Briefing 2020, with summaries of most relevant and noteworthy developments in June and July. Please click here to download the China Transport Sector Policy Briefing 2020, Issue 3Download Selected highlights of this Issue are: The update of China’s NEV Dual Credit System has been finalized. It is used to reward or penalize carmakers based on their share of NEVs and the fuel consumption of their produced fleet. The updated version continues a gradual increase of the required share of NEVs, but allows for some leeway in the calculation by crediting the production/import of vehicles with low…

Road transport, which currently accounts for around 75% of the total Chinese transport volume, is the second largest air-polluting sector in China. According to the Chinese Ministry of Ecology and Environment (MEE), trucks in particular are responsible for up to 75% of the particulate emissions in road transportation. In recent years, the Chinese government has implemented various measures to reduce emissions and to promote a more sustainable heavy goods transport. Among other things, the Chinese Ministry of Transport (MoT) announced in 2018 that China would abolish one million old diesel trucks in the Jing-Jin-Ji region by 2020. As a result, the demand for trucks with alternative drive systems is expected to increase in the coming years. The future development of these alternative and sustainable power supply solutions in the truck sector strongly depends on how the different interest groups prioritize emission reductions in transport. The most widely used alternative to…

The newest issue of our China Transport Sector Policy Briefing is here! The Sustainable Mobility Team at GIZ in China provides you with regular summaries of important policies in China’s transport sector. Inside this issue of the China Transport Sector Policy Briefing As China has slowly been regaining some kind of normalcy after the break induced by COVID-19, the built-up policy decision-making processes for 2020 have come into full swing in April and May. Below you will find Issue 2 of the China Transport Sector Policy Briefing 2020, with summaries of highly relevant and exciting developments in April and May. Please click here to download the China Sector Policy Briefing 2020, Issue 2Download Selected highlights of this Issue are: The economic slump caused by the COVID-19 pandemic has put a buffer on China’s economic and infrastructure ambitions. The National People’s Congress and the National Committee of the Chinese People’s Political…

The Chinese Spring Festival marks the beginning of a new year in the lunar calendar. It is known as China’s most celebrated holiday and a time for family reunification. The annual peak in travel associated with the lunar new year is the ultimate stress test for China’s transportation system. During chunyun (春运) translated as Spring Festival Transportation, every year up to 3 billion trips are made within a period of about 40 days1 domestically and to international destinations (compared to 116 million Americans traveling during the Christmas and New Year’s holiday in 20192). With passenger volumes rising annually, chunyun is holding on to its title as the world’s most voluminous human migration. This year’s Chinese Spring Festival Travel Rush, however, coincided with a particular challenge as it came at a time when China faced a major public health crisis with severe societal ramifications: The outbreak of the COVID-19 epidemic, caused by the virus SARS-CoV-2, which is thought to have originated in Wuhan, a hub in China’s transport and logistics network, and had reached pandemic proportions only weeks later. In the first days of the Spring Festival 20203 before initial transport restrictions were put in place to stall the spread…

Introduction During the Executive Meeting of the State Council[1] on 31 March 2020, the Chinese government has decided to extend the current purchasing subsidies and NEV purchase tax exemptions in order to stimulate vehicle consumption in China[2]. This came at a time, when the Chinese (and international) automotive industry is under immense pressure of downturn of production and sales due to the COVID-19 pandemic, in particular in the NEV industry. This article sheds light on the recent changes of the Chinese incentive policies for NEVs. The article gives an overview of the current market developments and the impact of the pandemic on the automotive and NEV industry in China, the measures taken by the Chinese government in order to stimulate car consumption. Pre-COVID-19: NEV incentive policies Against the background of energy security, electro-mobility is an important element of the Chinese government’s roadmap to promote climate-friendly and sustainable transport. China’s…

The newest issue of our China Transport Sector Policy Briefing is here! The Sustainable Mobility Team at GIZ in China provides you with regular summaries of important policies in China’s transport sector. Inside this issue of the China Transport Sector Policy Briefing After an extended break due to COVID-19, the China Transport Policy Briefing is back with its 1st issue of 2020. Whilst in Europe the pandemic situation is still in full swing, Beijing has been resuming work in a “new reality” after the wave has been overcome. Enclosed you will find summaries of highly relevant and exciting developments of December, January, February and March. Please click here to download the China Transport Policy Briefing 2020, 01Download Selected highlights of this Issue are: The economic downturn caused by the COVID-19 pandemic hit the Chinese car market while it was already at a low point. After several weeks of tight restrictions,…

Authors: Sebastian Ibold/GIZ, Nikola Medimorec/SLOCAT, Armin Wagner/GIZ [1]Contributions: Linus Platzer/GIZ, Victor Valente/GIZ Update: 20.3.2020 // Reflections on cycling, public space and introduction of proposed conceptual framework for transport sector response to COVID-19 based on Avoid-Shift-Improve Approach Update 27.3.2020 // Reflections on sequencing and prioritization of measures, impressions from Brazil, additional information / anecdotal evidence on (potential) impact Update 30.3.2020 // Reflections on COVID-19 impact on shared mobility Contents BackgroundCOVID-19 and Public TransportNeed for Coordinated ResponseNeed for Protection of Staff, Infrastructure and PassengersRecommendations to Protect Staff and InfrastructureRecommendations to Protect PassengersNeed for Coordinated Demand ManagementCOVID-19 and Shared-MobilityProposed Conceptual Framework for Transport Sector – Response to COVID-19 Based on Avoid-Shift-Improve ApproachFurther observations – Impacts of COVID-19SummaryQuestions for Further DiscussionAnnex: In-Depth Country Observation Brazil Background On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) has declared COVID-19 a global pandemic. As of March 26, about 2.6 billion people (including 1.3 billion in India…