Category

Urban Transport

Category

China’s economic growth and urbanisation over the past three decades have lifted millions out of poverty and improved the choices and wellbeing of many. At the same time, these processes have led to a massive increase in transport volume, making air pollution, congestion, traffic accidents and noise nuisance sad characteristics of Chinese metropolises that affect the newly gained quality of life. In addition, much of the growth in transport GHG emissions is generated in cities and urban growth is bound to continue for the next decades to come. Reducing GHG emissions from urban transport is therefore a necessity for sustainable development not only in Chinese cities but in the whole country and the world.

According to Katie Melua, there are nine-million bicycles in Beijing – and the city is working on bringing bicycles back to the roads by making cycling more safe and thus convenient. But Beijing is also exploring new ways to make cycling more attractive. In May 2019, the city’s first “bicycle highway” was opened to the public. The 6.5 km long partially elevated cycling-only road, which was designed by the Beijing Municipal Commission of Transport (BMCT), is connecting Huilongguan and the Zhongguancun High-Tech Area in Northern Beijing, offering safe, convenient and fast traveling to more than 8,000 commuters daily. Beijing’s First Bicycle Highway *If problems with playing the video occur, this may be due to country-specific internet restrictions. Back to the Kingdom of Bicyle Not so long ago, bikes were ubiquitous in China. As the dominating form of transportation, for the wealthy and working classes alike, the country had more than…