Category

Urban Transport

Category

China’s economic growth and urbanisation over the past three decades have lifted millions out of poverty and improved the choices and wellbeing of many. At the same time, these processes have led to a massive increase in transport volume, making air pollution, congestion, traffic accidents and noise nuisance sad characteristics of Chinese metropolises that affect the newly gained quality of life. In addition, much of the growth in transport GHG emissions is generated in cities and urban growth is bound to continue for the next decades to come. Reducing GHG emissions from urban transport is therefore a necessity for sustainable development not only in Chinese cities but in the whole country and the world.

China, once known as the kingdom of bicycles, has a long history of widespread bicycle usage. With growing urbanization, industrialization and popularization of alternative transport modes (such as subways), the status of the bicycle is at stake as usage is decreasing rapidly. However, the bicycle as a non-motorized transport mode is still a crucial vehicle to cover short and middle distances in urban and rural areas, with the further upside of low associated emissions and an increased quality of life. The following study starts by examining the general development of transport and systematic bicycle planning in China on a national level and is followed by a detailed analysis of the current bicycle systems and developments in six exemplary Chinese cities (Beijing, Hangzhou, Tianjin, Xiamen, Shenzhen and Zhangjiakou). Zhangjiakou is an important example here, as the Chinese government set the goal to transform the city‘s transport sector towards sustainability until the…