Category

Urban Transport

Category

China’s economic growth and urbanisation over the past three decades have lifted millions out of poverty and improved the choices and wellbeing of many. At the same time, these processes have led to a massive increase in transport volume, making air pollution, congestion, traffic accidents and noise nuisance sad characteristics of Chinese metropolises that affect the newly gained quality of life. In addition, much of the growth in transport GHG emissions is generated in cities and urban growth is bound to continue for the next decades to come. Reducing GHG emissions from urban transport is therefore a necessity for sustainable development not only in Chinese cities but in the whole country and the world.

Authors: Sebastian Ibold/GIZ, Nikola Medimorec/SLOCAT, Armin Wagner/GIZ [1]Contributions: Linus Platzer/GIZ, Victor Valente/GIZ Update: 20.3.2020 // Reflections on cycling, public space and introduction of proposed conceptual framework for transport sector response to COVID-19 based on Avoid-Shift-Improve Approach Update 27.3.2020 // Reflections on sequencing and prioritization of measures, impressions from Brazil, additional information / anecdotal evidence on (potential) impact Update 30.3.2020 // Reflections on COVID-19 impact on shared mobility Contents BackgroundCOVID-19 and Public TransportNeed for Coordinated ResponseNeed for Protection of Staff, Infrastructure and PassengersRecommendations to Protect Staff and InfrastructureRecommendations to Protect PassengersNeed for Coordinated Demand ManagementCOVID-19 and Shared-MobilityProposed Conceptual Framework for Transport Sector – Response to COVID-19 Based on Avoid-Shift-Improve ApproachFurther observations – Impacts of COVID-19SummaryQuestions for Further DiscussionAnnex: In-Depth Country Observation Brazil Background On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) has declared COVID-19 a global pandemic. As of March 26, about 2.6 billion people (including 1.3 billion in India…