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Against the background of global climate change, cities around the world are under immense pressure to make their transport systems more sustainable and climate friendly. Electro-mobility, ride-hailing, shared- and micro-mobility, autonomous driving and Big Data-based smart city and traffic management applications are offering opportunities to make transport more efficient and sustainable. Along with these opportunities comes the increasing unpredictability of how the future of transport and mobility will look like and which climate, environmental and social impacts are associated with these emerging trends. It is therefore of high urgency to have effective policies in place to ensure the climate and environmentally-friendly development of the mobility of tomorrow and to achieve the goals of sustainable development, outlined in global frameworks such as the Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) of the Paris Agreement or the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. In order to discuss the future of…

The transport sector in China needs to start outlining intermediate efforts to play its role in reaching the recently set long-term target: carbon neutrality by 2060 as announced by China’s President Xi Jinping on Tuesday, September 22, 2020 during his speech at the General Debate of the 75th session of the UN General Assembly. In particular, the transport sector plays a key role in achieving the ambitious target of decarbonization. The transport-related carbon emissions in China increased from 397 million tons in 2005 to 1.04 billion tons in 2018[1], accounting for about 10 percent of the country’s total emissions. Emission reduction, ambitious roadmaps and measures in transport are crucial to realizing the target of carbon neutrality, since transport is the only sector where carbon emissions will be most unlikely to peak around 2030. However, China in its Nationally Determined Contributions to the Paris Agreement pledged to have carbon emissions peak…

Authors: Sebastian Ibold/GIZ, Nikola Medimorec/SLOCAT, Armin Wagner/GIZ [1]Contributions: Linus Platzer/GIZ, Victor Valente/GIZ Update: 20.3.2020 // Reflections on cycling, public space and introduction of proposed conceptual framework for transport sector response to COVID-19 based on Avoid-Shift-Improve Approach Update 27.3.2020 // Reflections on sequencing and prioritization of measures, impressions from Brazil, additional information / anecdotal evidence on (potential) impact Update 30.3.2020 // Reflections on COVID-19 impact on shared mobility Contents BackgroundCOVID-19 and Public TransportNeed for Coordinated ResponseNeed for Protection of Staff, Infrastructure and PassengersRecommendations to Protect Staff and InfrastructureRecommendations to Protect PassengersNeed for Coordinated Demand ManagementCOVID-19 and Shared-MobilityProposed Conceptual Framework for Transport Sector – Response to COVID-19 Based on Avoid-Shift-Improve ApproachFurther observations – Impacts of COVID-19SummaryQuestions for Further DiscussionAnnex: In-Depth Country Observation Brazil Background On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) has declared COVID-19 a global pandemic. As of March 26, about 2.6 billion people (including 1.3 billion in India…

The way urban transport and the mobility industry have changed in the last years has no similar precedence. Traditionally, private cars and public transport have been the common choice for urban mobility, now enlarged by a plethora of new app-based mobility services such as ride-hailing or scooter-sharing which have permeated our cities. More recently, the focus is moving towards promoting innovations in public transport against car-based solutions in urban environments, also in China. For decades, China has invested in the development and expansion of its public transport infrastructure including High-Speed Railway (HSR), subway and Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) systems. But China also has promoted public transport innovation, in particular in the field of vehicle automation. A new approach to urban transport is the trackless tram, also known as Autonomous Rail Transit (ART), which caught the attention of the international transport community when it was unveiled by China Railway Rolling Stock Corporation (CRRC) in 2017. Trackless Tram in the city of Zhuzhou, Source: CRRC Zhuzhou Institute What are trackless trams? The trackless tram combines the capabilities…

All over the world, many cities are facing increasing levels of traffic congestion, road safety issues, as well as carbon and air pollutant emissions. In particular, the better integration of transport and urban planning is seen as a key to mitigate these effects and to create more livable cities. To promote smart and integrated urban mobility planning, the European Commission, in 2013, published the “Guidelines on Developing and Implementing A Sustainable Urban Mobility Plan”. Sustainable Urban Mobility Plans, also known as SUMP, aim at satisfying the mobility needs of people and businesses while improving the quality of life. The SUMP concept has been successfully applied in various countries around the world. In order to adapt to the current mobility trends, such as vehicle automation, vehicle electrification, shared mobility and their implications in the public transport systems, the SUMP guidelines were recently updated in their second edition, which you can find…

The 3rd World Transport Convention (WTC 2019) took place from 13-16 June in Beijing under the theme “Green and Intelligent Mobility for Future Transport”. The WTC 2019, which was organized by the China Highway and Transportation Society (CHTS), provided a platform to international organizations and academics as well as more than 6,000 participants and 50,000 visitors to debate, share experiences, and to explore collaboration potentials. The programme included various keynote speeches, a transport expo as well as more than 600 technical sessions and 60 forums focusing on topics such as non-motorized and smart transportation, shared mobility, and autonomous driving. The Sino-German Cooperation on Low Carbon Transportation project (CLCT) supported the WTC 2019 with co-organizing panels on the topics of urban cycling, Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS), green and smart ports as well as Sustainable Urban Mobility Planning (SUMP). Urban Cycling – Key to People-oriented Mobility Mr. Jörg Thiemann-Linden, traffic planner, designated…

Systematic and integrated transport planning is key to achieving low-carbon transport systems in cities. Sustainable Urban Mobility Planning can help cities to overcome institutional barriers by shifting from comprehensive transport planning with a focus on infrastructure towards integrated and climate-friendly mobility planning. On 25 April 2019, GIZ, together with the Institute for Environment and Sustainable Development (IESD), the Yinchuan Development and Reform Commission, the Yinchuan Foreign Affairs Office, and various local government departments, jointly organized a one-day technical workshop in the Chinese city of Yinchuan on the concept of SUMP. The aim of the workshop was to jointly elaborate on how SUMP can contribute to a more sustainable development of Yinchuan’s transport and mobility system and to conduct an in-depth exchange on the status quo of Yinchuan’s transport system and its future development pathway. Yinchuan, a forerunner in innovation and sustainable urban development Yinchuan, the capital of the Ningxia Hui…

China Transport Sector Policy Briefing – October 2018 The October edition of our China Transport Sector Policy Briefing is here! The Sustainable Mobility Team at GIZ in China provides you with a monthly summary of new important policies in China’s transport sector. Please click here to download: China Transport Sector Policy Briefing October 2018  In October, the Three-Year Plan on the Restructuring of the Transport Sector has set its focus on the shift from road to rail and waterway, while provincial and municipal policies targeted the promotion of new energy industries and new energy vehicles (NEVs). Safety has received prioritization in Beijing with a series of regulations for light electric vehicles. Restructuring of the transport sector, new energy and NEV promotion at provincial and municipal level, light electric vehicle regulations in Beijing This month another major plan for the transport sector has been released by the State Council. The Three-Year Plan…

With rapid economic development and accelerated urbanization, Chinese cities are experiencing a substantial growth in vehicle population and motorized mobility. Yet, vehicle ownership rates are still a fraction of those in developed countries—118 motor vehicles per 1,000 persons in 2015 compared to 748 per 1,000 persons in Germany. Against this background, we expect continued growth of vehicle demand in China, especially in tier 3 and tier 4 cities. The rapidly growing number of motorized vehicles puts high pressure on the cities’ transport systems, while greenhouse gas emissions and local air pollutants, as well as external costs of traffic congestion, are increasing. Neither the provision of additional road infrastructure nor the development of new car technologies can overcome all these challenges. A sustainable solution to the city’s traffic problems can only be achieved by implementing travel demand management (TDM) strategies. Particularly parking management as one of the most effective TDM policies…

Cities in China are continuing to suffer from heavy and often slow traffic. According to China Daily, Jinan, Beijing and Harbin are China’s three most congested cities. Jinan traffic, for example, only has an average speed of 21.12 km/h during rush hour. With increased commute times and greenhouse gas emissions, the external costs of traffic congestion are increasing. However, neither the provision of additional road infrastructure nor the development of new car technologies alone can overcome these challenges. Thus, in 2011, the Ministry of Transport (MoT) initiated the Transit Metropolis Programme. Its goal is to promote public transport in cities through better service, more complete infrastructures, efficient management and strong support from local governments. Within that framework, city governments and decision makers have become increasingly interested in how to establish accessible and affordable public transport services and how to create more livable cities. In support of these efforts, GIZ has…