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The newest issue of our China Transport Sector Policy Briefing is here! The Sustainable Mobility Team at GIZ in China provides you with regular summaries of important policies in China’s transport sector. Inside this issue of the China Transport Sector Policy Briefing Below, you will find Issue 3 of the China Transport Sector Policy Briefing 2020, with summaries of most relevant and noteworthy developments in June and July. Please click here to download the China Transport Sector Policy Briefing 2020, Issue 3Download Selected highlights of this Issue are: The update of China’s NEV Dual Credit System has been finalized. It is used to reward or penalize carmakers based on their share of NEVs and the fuel consumption of their produced fleet. The updated version continues a gradual increase of the required share of NEVs, but allows for some leeway in the calculation by crediting the production/import of vehicles with low…

Road transport, which currently accounts for around 75% of the total Chinese transport volume, is the second largest air-polluting sector in China. According to the Chinese Ministry of Ecology and Environment (MEE), trucks in particular are responsible for up to 75% of the particulate emissions in road transportation. In recent years, the Chinese government has implemented various measures to reduce emissions and to promote a more sustainable heavy goods transport. Among other things, the Chinese Ministry of Transport (MoT) announced in 2018 that China would abolish one million old diesel trucks in the Jing-Jin-Ji region by 2020. As a result, the demand for trucks with alternative drive systems is expected to increase in the coming years. The future development of these alternative and sustainable power supply solutions in the truck sector strongly depends on how the different interest groups prioritize emission reductions in transport. The most widely used alternative to…

When the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic became an international challenge at the beginning of March 2020, we very quickly realized that the impact on the transport sector would be enormous. Not only that the transport sector is one of the transmission vectors, but also that with the social and economic constraints, it became clear that transport demand would decrease and that transport services would have to be adapted to the conditions of the emergency. The result of our early observations and analysis is an initial summary – it traces, documents and provides initial orientation. It documents the period early of March to early May 2020, i.e. the phase in which the COVID-19 crisis took on a global character. The paper concentrates on urban mobility, looks at the COVID-19 crisis itself, measures taken by cities and the respective potential effects. It does not claim to be exhaustive or balanced, but…

Electro-mobility and New Energy Vehicles (NEV)[1] are important elements of the Chinese government’s strategy to promote climate-friendly and sustainable transport. In particular, the promotion of public transport and the adoption of New Energy Buses play a central role in realizing those ambitions. In recent years, China’s central government and local authorities have launched various support policies to push market development, foster advanced industry chains, create a skilled labor force and to achieve technological breakthroughs and efficiency gains in the field of New Energy Bus technology. Supportive policies include subsidies for purchasing and operating New Energy Buses, as well as tax reductions and other incentives for phasing out and decommissioning buses with conventional combustion engines. By the end of 2019, more than 400,000 New Energy Buses were in operation in China. The share of New Energy Buses in the overall bus market increased from about 1% in 2013 to 55% in…

Over the past twenty years, the Chinese transport sector has undergone a monumental transformation. Today, China is the world’s largest car market, has the planet’s largest High-Speed Rail (HSR) system, is the world’s second largest civil aviation market and houses seven of the planet’s ten largest container ports. An astounding achievement considering the country had under 20,000 registered private cars in 1985 and not a single HSR line until 2008. Simply phrased, China has ‘put the pedal to the metal’. However, China’s rise came along with alarming environmental and climate change issues as transport emissions have increased more than tenfold since 1980. Today, China is not only the world’s single largest emitter of greenhouse gasses, but its transport sector is the country’s third largest contributor. Furthermore, China is plagued by notorious air pollution that provokes alarming health concerns amongst its 1.4 billion strong population. With incomes continuing to grow among…

Freight ship enters harbour Within the framework of the project “Mobility and Fuels Strategy (MFS) as a Contribution to the Transport Transition in China – Pilot in the Jing-Jin-Ji Region”, Mr. Ralf Fiedler from the Fraunhofer Center for Maritime Logistics and Services (CML) travelled to China from 21 to 24 August 2018. The goal of his visit was to work with the Tianjin Research Institute for Water Transport Engineering (TIWTE) under the Chinese Ministry of Transport (MOT) on identifying suitable project topics for the ongoing Chinese-German MFS cooperation in the field of green port development. In the following months, TIWTE, Fraunhofer CML and GIZ in China will carry out three joint studies that are dealing with the analysis and evaluation of energy efficiency in automatic container terminals, the optimization and promotion policies of shore-to-ship power supply systems as well as concepts for conversion towards green ports. In order to further…

In 2017, 29 million new vehicles were sold in China – more than in the United States, Japan and India combined. This figure is expected to increase to at least 37 million by 2025, assuming a 3% annual growth rate. Given this vast market potential, the same question comes up time and again within the global automotive industry: What proportion of these vehicles will be so-called Intelligent and Connected Vehicles (ICVs)? China’s determination to become the world’s leading automotive nation is matched by their desire to shape the future of mobility. Together with the rapid increase in New Energy Vehicles (NEVs), the development of its ICV industry lies at the heart of this ambition. After some initial hesitation, China has undertaken numerous steps to accelerate the development of ICVs in 2018. Following recent legislative changes, the adoption of national strategies, as well as improvements in its connectivity-based technologies, it is…

Developments in the field of New Energy Vehicles (NEVs) in China have exceeded all expectations. The Middle Kingdom is by far the largest market for NEVs, with 50 % of global passenger cars being sold here (International Energy Agency (IEA), 2018). The numbers for NEVs are ever increasing: in the first half of 2018, NEV sales already reached 412,000, up from 195,000 vehicles sold in the first half of the previous year (Center for Automotive Management (CAM), 2018). Overall, China has taken a pioneering role in the e-mobility sector, with numerous Chinese cities on their way to having a fully electrified bus fleet by 2020, if not sooner. China’ s quick progress in the electro-mobility field is as much a result of industrial policy considerations as environmental concerns. A comprehensive electro-mobility ecosystem is a foundational aspect of what China regards as a strategic industry in the coming decades, supported by…

As a major global economic driving force, the transport sector –and in particular the automotive sector– has provided employment and shaped technological progress over the course of a century. This is true for Germany as much as it is for China. Daunting climate and environmental concerns have cast a large shadow on this development. The tangible negative impacts of transport such as air pollution, accidents, noise and congestion are more than a nuisance to residents living, working or visiting in Chinas’ megacities, along Chinas’ coastlines and waterways. A less perceptible, yet significant impact is the resulting carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from internal combustion engines burning fossil fuels. The associated negative social, environmental and climatic impacts pose a dilemma for policy makers worldwide. Energy security, climate protection and air quality have to be taken into account as much as economic efficiency, growth and acceptance. Accordingly, the purpose of practical transport policy…

Due to the rapid economic development in recent years, China is experiencing substantial growth in vehicle population and motorisation, which has lead to a strong increase in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and air pollution. In order to reduce emissions and meet the carbon emission targets, city governments and decision makers are increasingly interested in understanding the effectiveness of transportation measures. To control and facilitate GHG emissions and pollutants in any form, quantifying the emissions being released is a fundamental requirement. This, in turn, demands data on fleet composition, travel activities, and emission factors. In contrast to Europe and the United States, publicly accessible emission factor databases, particularly for the quantification of traffic-related GHG emissions, are not available in China. There is also no publicly released official tool or inventory model for GHG emissions accounting for mobile sources at the national or regional level. Therefore GIZ initiated – as one task…