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All over the world, many cities are facing increasing levels of traffic congestion, road safety issues, as well as carbon and air pollutant emissions. In particular, the better integration of transport and urban planning is seen as a key to mitigate these effects and to create more livable cities. To promote smart and integrated urban mobility planning, the European Commission, in 2013, published the “Guidelines on Developing and Implementing A Sustainable Urban Mobility Plan”. Sustainable Urban Mobility Plans, also known as SUMP, aim at satisfying the mobility needs of people and businesses while improving the quality of life. The SUMP concept has been successfully applied in various countries around the world. In order to adapt to the current mobility trends, such as vehicle automation, vehicle electrification, shared mobility and their implications in the public transport systems, the SUMP guidelines were recently updated in their second edition, which you can find…

The transport sector represents the biggest challenge for climate policy The German government has set the target of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 80-95% by 2050 (reference year: 1990). To achieve this requires complete decarbonization, which means largely giving up the burning of fossils. All sectors must contribute to this transition. While many sectors have seen major emissions reductions in recent years, the transport sector, which accounts for almost one-fifth of greenhouse gas emissions, has shown a slight increase (see Figure 1). The major contributor to this rise is road transport due to increases in demand for transport, engine performance and vehicle weight since 1990, offsetting any improvements to efficiency over the same period. The German government’s Climate Action Plan 2050 includes the ambitious medium-term goal of a 40-42% reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in transport sector by 2030. Heated political and juristic discussions are currently underway in German cities…